Tag Archives: NYC Speech Therapist

NYC Speech Pathologist

Lisp treatment in NY

NYC Speech Pathologist

NYC Speech Pathologist

Many of our patients who mumble, have a lisp (also known as sibilance), or slight to moderate stutter have sought out our help. If you’ve tried a speech pathologist and got no results, or were disappointed with the results of speech therapy, then it’s time you let our NYC speech pathologist, Stacey Miller, SLP, correct your speech impediment.

Most speech faults result from incorrect formation of vowels and consonants. This means that most issues can be corrected. The fundamental purpose of therapy is to bring harmony to the muscles of the tongue, lips, and cheeks. Disharmony of these muscles can cause unfavorable speech. Depending on your specific challenges, we can devise a training program best suited to your needs. You will be shown how to modify your speech patterns and sound formation. Ongoing exercises will ensure long term improvement. We’ve managed to correct even the worst lisps and stutters. For those seeking lisp treatment, our NYC speech pathologist will help you acquire strategies and techniques that increase the fluency of speech and decrease dysfluencies such as prolongations (unnatural stretching out of a sound), blockages, and repetitions of sound, syllables, and words. You will also learn relaxation techniques to decrease anxiety and tension and the associative behaviors such as facial grimaces or ticks that often accompany speech behaviors. If you require our services for a stutter correction, we can help improve speech-sound production by developing and understanding the physiological movements involved to produce the various speech sounds. We will work towards achieving maximum speech clarity that is related to your lisp and other sound distortions.

If you would like to learn more about speech pathology, we highly recommend that you visit our practice’s main website to browse through some additional, detailed information that you might find useful. If you have any specific questions or concerns regarding lisp treatment and stutter correction that we can help you with, please do not hesitate to contact the staff here directly. Our NYC pathologist, Dr. Miller, looks forward to working with you and creating a realistic and functional communication plan for each child and family.

Stacey Miller, SLP
646-525-4817

Does Your Child Require Speech Therapy?

Speech Therapy Manhattan

In a recent parent-teacher conference, the teacher expressed concern that your child may be having a problem with certain speech or language skills. Or maybe while talking to your child, you noticed an occasional stutter and have become concerned for his or her future.

Could your child have a problem? And if so, what should you do? Call Stacy Miller, the best Speech Pathologist for Children in Manhattan

It is wise and your duty as a good parent to intervene quickly. An evaluation by a certified speech-language pathologist can help determine if your child is having difficulties. Speech-language therapy is the treatment for most kids with speech and/or language disorders.

Stacy Miller, SLP. will help you identify what sort of therapy your child will need. A speech disorder refers to a problem with the production of sounds, while a language disorder refers to the difficulty understanding or putting words together to communicate ideas.

Speech disorders include:

  • Articulation disorders: difficulties producing sounds in syllables or saying words incorrectly to the point that listeners can’t understand what’s being said.
  • Fluency disorders: problems such as stuttering, in which the flow of speech is interrupted by abnormal stoppages, repetitions (st-st-stuttering), or prolonging sounds and syllables (ssssstuttering).
  • Resonance or voice disorders: problems with the pitch, volume, or quality of the voice that distract listeners from what’s being said. These types of disorders may also cause pain or discomfort for a child when speaking.
  • Dysphagia/oral feeding disorders: these include difficulties with drooling, eating, and swallowing.

Language disorders can be either receptive or expressive:

  • Receptive disorders: difficulties understanding or processing language.
  • Expressive disorders: difficulty putting words together, limited vocabulary, or inability to use language in a socially appropriate way.

Stacy Miller SLP has over 10 years of experience working with children with moderate to severe learning disabilities and sensory integration and her expertise embodies both experience and passion.  She is also fluent in sign language.  Stacey believes that every child deserves a chance to express his/her everyday wants, needs, thoughts and ideas regularly.  Therefore, she will work diligently to find a way, whether it be verbal or non-verbal, for her clients to feel the pleasure of being able to communicate efficiently with family, friends and teachers in all environments.

Do not hesitate to call,

Stacy Miller – SLP, MA, CCC, TSHH
(646) 525-4817

 

Speech Therapy Manhattan

What Is Speech-Language Therapy?

Speech-language therapy is the treatment for most kids with speech and/or language disorders. A speech disorder refers to a problem with the actual production of sounds, whereas a language disorder refers to a difficulty understanding or putting words together to communicate ideas.

Speech Disorders and Language Disorders

Speech disorders include the following problems, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA):

  • Articulation disorders include difficulties producing sounds in syllables or saying words incorrectly to the point that other people can’t understand what’s being said.
  • Fluency disorders include problems such as stuttering, the condition in which the flow of speech is interrupted by abnormal stoppages, repetitions (st-st-stuttering), or prolonging sounds and syllables (ssssstuttering).
  • Resonance or voice disorders include problems with the pitch, volume, or quality of the voice that distract listeners from what’s being said. These types of disorders may also cause pain or discomfort for the child when speaking.
  • Dysphagia/oral feeding disorders, including difficulties with eating and swallowing.

When Is Therapy Needed?

Kids might need speech-language therapy for a variety of reasons, including:

  • hearing impairments
  • cognitive (intellectual; thinking) or other developmental delays
  • weak oral muscles
  • birth defects such as cleft lip or cleft palate
  • autism
  • motor planning problems
  • respiratory problems (breathing disorders)
  • swallowing disorders
  • traumatic brain injury

Therapy should begin as soon as possible. Children enrolled in therapy early in their development (younger than 3 years) tend to have better outcomes than those who begin therapy later.

This does not mean that older kids can’t make progress in therapy; they may progress at a slower rate because they often have learned patterns that need to be changed.

Language disorders can be either receptive or expressive:

  • Receptive disorders refer to difficulties understanding or processing language.
  • Expressive disorders include difficulty putting words together, limited vocabulary, or inability to use language in a socially appropriate way

Specialists in Speech-Language Therapy

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), often informally known as speech therapists, are professionals educated in the study of human communication, its development, and its disorders. They hold at least a master’s degree and state certification/licensure in the field, as well as a certificate of clinical competency from ASHA.

By assessing the speech, language, cognitive-communication, and swallowing skills of children and adults, speech-language pathologists can identify types of communication problems and the best way to treat them.

SLPs treat problems in the areas of articulation; dysfluency; oral-motor, speech, and voice; and receptive and expressive language disorders.

Remediation

In speech-language therapy, an SLP will work with a child one-to-one, in a small group, or directly in a classroom to overcome difficulties involved with a specific disorder.

Therapists use a variety of strategies, including:

  • language intervention activities. In these exercises an SLP will interact with a child by playing and talking. The therapist may use pictures, books, objects, or ongoing events to stimulate language development. The therapist may also model correct pronunciation and use repetition exercises to build speech and language skills.
  • articulation therapy. Articulation, or sound production, exercises involve having the therapist model correct sounds and syllables for a child, often during play activities. The level of play is age-appropriate and related to the child’s specific needs. The SLP will physically show the child how to make certain sounds, such as the “r” sound, and may demonstrate how to move the tongue to produce specific sounds.
  • oral motor/feeding therapy. The SLP will use a variety of oral exercises, including facial massage and various tongue, lip, and jaw exercises, to strengthen the muscles of the mouth. The SLP may also work with different food textures and temperatures to increase a child’s oral awareness during eating and swallowing.

(Source: http://kidshealth.org)